Publicidad


 

Inicio Foros ¿Cómo es la vida de un inmigrante en Canadá? profesiones mas tranferibles y barreras..

  • Este debate tiene 1 respuesta, 1 mensaje y ha sido actualizado por última vez el hace 15 años, 10 meses por Invitado MQI.
Viendo 2 entradas - de la 1 a la 2 (de un total de 2)
  • Autor
    Entradas
  • #205643
    Invitado MQI
    Miembro

    Este informe da una mirada a la insercion y las barreras de algunas profesiones comunes.

    http://www11.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/hrsdc/lmp/publications/2003-002626/page09.shtml

    An Index of the Employment Opportunities for New Immigrants, Based on Skills Transferability and Occupational Barriers – January 2003

    6.1 Introduction
    The model described in this Report provides a basis for examining the effects of a number of factors on the potential employment opportunities of new immigrants in an occupation. The factors included in the Model are the skills transferability between occupations, barriers that affect entry to each occupation, earnings in each occupation, job prospects in each occupation, and the level of employment in each occupation. Experiments with the Model show that skills transferability and occupational barriers are the most important of these factors. The effects of earnings, job prospects, and the level of employment are also important; but they depend on the skills transferability and occupational barriers in the occupation.

    The results of the Model may be useful for developing government policy and for providing advice for new immigrants. It seems reasonable, in the short-term, to treat the occupational barriers identified in the Model as being fixed. But does this mean that immigrants in occupations with highly effective barriers should be given lower priority in the immigration selection process? Should immigrants in occupations with highly effective barriers be discouraged from immigrating to Canada? Conversely, should immigrants in occupations with no barriers and high skills transferability be encouraged to immigrate to Canada, and should they be given preference in the immigration selection process? Should governments work, over the long-term, towards removing occupational barriers or at least towards reducing their effectiveness?

    These are complex questions, but the Model may be useful in addressing them. In the next section, we suggest a basis for doing so: we also include examples that illustrate how the Model may be useful.

    6.2 Using the Model
    The discussion that follows is based on a categorization of occupations into four types:

    Occupations with highly effective barriers and low skills transferability to other occupations.
    Occupations with highly effective barriers and high skills transferability to other occupations.
    Occupations with no barriers or with partly effective barriers and low skills transferability to other occupations.
    Occupations with no barriers or with partly effective barriers and high skills transferability to other occupations.

    6.2.1 Occupations with highly effective barriers and low skills transferability to other occupations
    Occupations in this category include: ‘Air Traffic Control Occupations’, ‘Occupational Therapists’, ‘Lawyers and Quebec Notaries’, ‘Electricians (except Industrial and Power System)’, and ‘Plumbers’.

    Since the barriers in these occupations are highly effective, most new immigrants in these occupations (who were educated or trained in a foreign country) would not be able to enter the occupation on immigrating to Canada. Moreover, they would not be able to use their skills and knowledge in any other occupation in the Model. This suggests that they would probably be well advised not to consider immigrating to Canada unless they were willing to undertake a retraining program, or to work in an occupation requiring lower skills and knowledge than they possess: the required period of retraining and the likelihood of success would vary by occupation.

    It would also seem reasonable that individuals qualified in these occupations (and educated in a foreign country) should be given a low priority in the immigration selection process. Such individuals would not be able to enter the occupation in which they were trained, and they would not be able to use their skills and knowledge in any other occupation in the Model. It follows that they would have no competitive advantages in meeting the needs for skilled workers in Canada.

    It is also evident, from a policy perspective, that governments would not be able to use immigration in such occupations as a short-run mechanism for reducing labour shortages. For example, increasing the number of immigrants qualified in a foreign country to work as ‘Electricians (except Industrial and Power System)’ would not affect the short-run supply in the occupation; such immigrants would need to undertake a retraining program before they could enter the occupation in Canada.

    Over the long-term, it would be useful for governments to undertake policies and programs that would encourage regulatory bodies to reassess the requirements that foreign-educated workers must meet in order to obtain a certificate or licence in these occupations. Such policies and programs could be particularly useful in eliminating or reducing informal barriers (such as the lack of recognition of foreign credentials, and the difficulty immigrants have in getting work experience in Canada) that make it even more difficult for new immigrants to meet the requirements for entry to some occupations.

    6.2.2 Occupations with highly effective barriers and high skills transferability to other occupations

    Occupations in this category include: ‘General Practitioners and Family Physicians’, ‘Pharmacists’, ‘Registered Nurses’, and ‘Psychologists’.

    Since the barriers in these occupations are highly effective (like those in the previous category), most new immigrants (educated or trained in a foreign country) would not be able to enter one of these occupations on immigrating to Canada. However, since there is a high degree of skills transferability for these occupations, new immigrants would be able to use their skills and knowledge in other occupations in the Model. Thus, even though they would not be able to enter the occupations in which they were trained, new immigrants in these occupations could find jobs in similar occupations. For example, new immigrants trained as ‘Pharmacists’ in a foreign country would be able to work in occupations with related skills and knowledge (such as ‘Medical Laboratory Technologists and Pathologists’ Assistants’). Thus they may be able to use their skills and knowledge, and to do so while undertaking a retraining program in Canada.

    It would also seem reasonable that individuals qualified in these occupations (and educated in a foreign country) should be given a low priority in the immigration selection process since they would not be able to enter the occupation on immigrating to Canada. However, since they would be able to use their skills and knowledge in another occupation in the Model, it would make sense that they be given a higher priority than individuals in the occupations in the previous category.

    Like the occupations in the previous category, governments would not be able to use immigration as a short-run mechanism for reducing labour shortages in the occupations in this category. For example, increasing the number of immigrants, qualified in a foreign country to work as ‘Registered Nurses’, could not be used to affect the short-run supply in the occupation, since such immigrants would need to undertake a retraining program before they could enter the occupation in Canada. However, foreign-trained workers in the occupation may be able to use their skills and knowledge while undertaking a retraining program in Canada.

    As in the previous category, it would be useful for governments to undertake policies and programs to encourage regulatory bodies to reassess the requirements that foreign-educated workers must meet in order to obtain a certificate or licence in these occupations. Here again, such policies and programs could be particularly useful in eliminating or reducing informal barriers (such as the lack of recognition of foreign credentials, and the difficulty immigrants have in getting work experience in Canada) that make it even more difficult for new immigrants to overcome formal barriers in these occupations.

    6.2.3 Occupations with no barriers or with partly effective barriers and low skills transferability to other occupations
    Occupations in this category include: ‘Secretaries (except Legal and Medical)’, ‘Meteorologists’, ‘Medical Laboratory Technicians’, ‘Education Policy Researchers, Consultants and Program Officers’, and ‘Tool and Die Makers’.

    Since there are no barriers in these occupations or the barriers are only partially effective, some new immigrants (educated and trained in a foreign country) would be able to enter the occupation on immigrating to Canada. At the same time, because of the low degree of skills transferability in these occupations, new immigrants would not be able to use their skills and knowledge in other occupations in the Model. It follows that new immigrants in occupations in this category would be well advised to pay close attention to economic factors (wages, job prospects and total employment) affecting the relative demand for the occupation in Canada.

    For example, the job prospects for ‘Meteorologists’ in Canada are poor and total employment in the occupation is very small: thus new immigrants trained in this occupation may find it difficult to find a job in the occupation. By contrast, the job prospects for ‘Medical Laboratory Technicians’ in Canada are fair and total employment in the occupation is considerably larger than that for ‘Meteorologists’: thus individuals trained as ‘Medical Laboratory Technicians’ may find it somewhat easier than ‘Meteorologists’ to find a job in Canada.

    Since some new immigrants in the occupations in this category would be able to enter their occupation on immigrating to Canada, it would seem reasonable that they should be given somewhat higher priority in the immigration selection process than those in the two categories above. However, since they would be not able to use their skills and knowledge in another occupation in the Model, it would make sense that economic factors (wages, job prospects and total employment) affecting the relative demand for the occupation in Canada be considered in setting their priority in the selection process.

    Unlike the occupations in the two previous categories, governments could use immigration in the occupations in this category as a short-run mechanism for reducing labour shortages. For example, increasing the number of immigrants, qualified in a foreign country to work as ‘Tool and Die Makers’, could be used to affect the short-run supply in the occupation since such immigrants could enter the occupation on immigrating to Canada.

    It would also be useful for governments to undertake policies and programs that would help to eliminate or reduce informal barriers that may make it difficult for new immigrants to find jobs in some of these occupations. Such programs may include, for example, encouraging employers to employ qualified new immigrants, and instituting programs to ensure that new immigrants are well informed about the availability of labour market information and the methods they can use for accessing it.

    6.2.4 Occupations with no barriers or with partly effective barriers and high skills transferability to other occupations
    Occupations in this category include: ‘Financial Auditors and Accountants’, ‘Chemists’, ‘Computer Engineers’, ‘Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technologists and Technicians’, ‘Social Workers’, and ‘Journalists’.

    Since there are no barriers in these occupations or the barriers are only partially effective, some new immigrants (trained in a foreign country) would be able to enter the occupation on immigrating to Canada. Moreover, since there is a high degree of skills transferability in these occupations, new immigrants would be able to use their skills and knowledge in other occupations in the Model. It follows that new immigrants in occupations in this category are likely to have employment opportunities in other occupations: thus, it would make sense for them to consider economic conditions (wages, job prospects and total employment) in these other occupations (as well as in the occupation in which they were trained) in making their decisions to immigrate.

    For example, individuals trained as ‘Financial Auditors and Accountants’ can also work as ‘Administrative Officers’. Since the job prospects for ‘Administrative Officers’ are good, and earnings and employment in the occupation are almost as high as for ‘Financial Auditors and Accountants’, new immigrants trained as ‘Financial Auditors and Accountants’ are likely to have good employment opportunities as ‘Administrative Officers’.

    Some new immigrants trained in the occupations in this category would be able to enter those occupations on immigrating to Canada, and they would be able to use their skills and knowledge in another occupation in the Model: it would seem reasonable therefore that they be given a high priority in the immigration selection process.

    To some extent, governments would also be able to use immigration as a short-run mechanism for reducing labour shortages in the occupations in this category. But since new immigrants in the occupations in this category are likely to have employment opportunities in other occupations, such a policy may not be effective. For example, increasing the number of immigrants, qualified in a foreign country to work as ‘Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technologists and Technicians’, could be used to try to increase the short-run supply in the occupation; but the policy may not be successful since new immigrants may choose to enter another occupation instead (such as ‘Industrial Instrument Technicians and Mechanics’).

    As in the category above, it would also be useful for governments to undertake policies and programs that would help to eliminate or reduce informal barriers that may make it difficult for new immigrants to obtain employment in some of these occupations. These policies may include, for example, encouraging employers to provide jobs for qualified new immigrants, and instituting programs to ensure that new immigrants are well informed about the availability of labour market information and the methods they can use for accessing it.

    6.3 Suggestions for future work
    As pointed out in the text in this Report, there are some limitations in

    #205644
    Invitado MQI
    Miembro

    Latina:

    El problema NO es que tu profesion NO sea transferible. El problema es que aunque tus equivalencias de estudios sean parecidas o mejores que las credenciales canadienses…. ninguna compa&ia esta obligada a cosiderarles.

    LAHS

Viendo 2 entradas - de la 1 a la 2 (de un total de 2)
  • Debes estar registrado para responder a este debate.

 

Publicidad