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  • #216538
    sofiputa
    Miembro

    It seems that there are a few success stories of immigrants from non-English speaking countries. There are many more not-so successful stories, and – judging by the contributions to this web site – more than a handful of terrible, terrible stories of failure and regret. My own story includes all of the above.

    I immigrated to Canada in 1968; a starry eyed, curious, and naive 19 year old Austrian fellow with eight years of basic schooling, and a journeyman diploma in printing. It wasn’t long before I realized that the “sorry, no Canadian experience” was only a convenient excuse for not hiring suitably qualified “foreigners”. Like many of my fellow immigrants, I worked in many God-awful menial jobs (social scientists have a word for it: underemployed). And like many of my fellow immigrants, I worked hard for every rung up the proverbial ladder. In 1973, I proudly accepted Canadian citizenship (only to realize afterwards, that I automatically lost my former citizenship – Austria does not recognize dual citizenship).

    In 1979, – after a lot of educational “catching up” at night school – I graduated from the University of Alberta with a bachelor degree in vocational education, followed by months of unexpected unemployment, dwindling financial resources, and crushing disbelief. Any occasional work was in the form of short term contracts (you know, no benefits). In 1985, I graduated with a master of education degree, followed by – you guessed it – unemployment and short-term, meaningless, and dead-end jobs (does an “MS” degree stand for “More of the Same”?).

    From 1987 to 1997 I worked on various overseas projects (including a 2 year stint with CIDA on Timor Island), ironically teaching Canadian “expertise” and “know-how” to people in developing countries. In 1998, I returned to Canada, hoping to stay in Canada at last, and after six months of unemployment (and no UI benefits), I was offered a position as Dean at an Institute of Technology. After two years, the institute restructured (again!), and I was out of a job without any warning or stated reason. At that time, I was 50 years old, unemployed (again), without much hope to finally embarking on a real career in my adopted country. I lost my house, many of my possessions, and half of my life’s savings.

    I left Canada, bitter, disappointed, and angry at myself for overstaying my welcome for so long. So many lost and lonely years! Afterwards, I worked for several years as university lecturer in a Southeast Asian country, and have now found a place in the sun in Malaysia. Now I work as ministerial adviser on training and employment matters, and look forward to the early 2007 opening of my own bed-and-breakfast inn in a spectacular natural environment. I’ve been told many times: Canada: love it or leave it. I’ve done both.
    Peter A. Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia.

    #216539
    sofiputa
    Miembro

    Sad to know about Peter’s story; but this is a more likely example for all prospective immigrants who believe in hard work.

    Immigrants are told in their first few years that their hardship is temporary, with their hard work and gained education/experience they would be enter into their career very soon.

    Then after many years hardship they eventually discover that they are trapped forever in their under jobs and it is already too late to return to their home country.

    I’m not saying always, but if you even get a local high class university degree chance is very high that you won’t get job (as Peter, me, and many others).

    Canada is traditionally a service based country and professional opportunities are very small, so nepotism plays above all. If you don’t have any personal relationship, then all of your qualifications are worthless.

    Read this paper; [url]http://www.ccis-ucsd.org/PUBLICATIONS/wrkg20.PDF[/url].
    You will find the facts about the educated people in Canada. How every year Canada loses many thousands of it’s own university graduates to the USA for ever. in 1996, there were even 120,000 illegal Canadians in the US.
    Do Canadians ever think why this is so? Did you ever think of any other 1st world citizens go illegal in another countries? How shameful it is!

    Now some started to believe that immigrants are facing problem in job finding (even still many think it is not true, they have plenty of jobs and immigrants are all making stories).

    However, all have the impression that it is because of immigrants foreign credentials. It is partially true, but the major underlying cause is Lack of Opportunities. How would recognition of foreign credentials help if there are many thousands applicants and always local graduates are available? This simple but black side is never discussed anywhere. Nobody feels to discuss about the locally educated unemployed guys.

    In Canada, you will be fighting for even a menial job and on the other hand have to listen "Severe Labor Crisis", "Industries are complaining", "Need to Increase Immigration Quota". Hard to digest. Such hypocrisy is only possible in Canada.

    Shah. Florida.

    ————-

    In Canada, you will be fighting for even a menial job and on the other hand have to listen "Severe Labor Crisis", "Industries are complaining", "Need to Increase Immigration Quota".

    In Canada, you will be fighting for even a menial job and on the other hand have to listen "Severe Labor Crisis", "Industries are complaining", "Need to Increase Immigration Quota".

    In Canada, you will be fighting for even a menial job and on the other hand have to listen "Severe Labor Crisis", "Industries are complaining", "Need to Increase Immigration Quota".

    #216540
    Invitado MQI
    Miembro

    ya volvio el wuilmer peruano a hacer de las suyas, te extrañabamos hermano!!!

    #216541
    Invitado MQI
    Miembro

    Algo de razón hay en estos artículos, incluso uno de los candidatos al Partido liberal lo reconoce: [url]http://www.cbc.ca/sunday/kennedy.html[/url]

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